Latest News: The Who

Rock Star Hobbies

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David Lovering, Pixies Drummer and Performing Magician

Pixies drummer by night, The Scientific Phenomenalist by day, David Lovering defies preconceived notions of rock stardom. While at times his performances are more scientific than magical, more comedic than awe-inspiring, Lovering knows how to intrigue and humor audiences. He does extraordinary tricks with simple props, which range from smoke and pickles to a chair and Jack in the Box antenna ball. In any case, it’s nice to see a drummer finally getting the spotlight for a change. Roger Daltrey, The Who Singer and Trout Farmer Many know that The Who frontman was in such films as Tommy and The Kids Are Alright – but Underwater World of Trout, Vol. 1? Yes, that’s right – when charismatic rock god Roger Daltrey isn’t selling out stadiums on tour, he likes to relax by doing a bit of trout farming. He even designed and built his very own trout farm, Lakedown Trout Fishery, in England about 30 years ago (which can be seen on Underwater World of Trout, Vol. 1). "When I go fishing," Daltrey claims, "I come away feeling like I've smoked half a dozen joints." Well, that’s enough to inspire any young trout farming enthusiast. Bill Wyman, Rolling Stone Bassist and Treasure Hunter Roger Daltrey’s hobby isn’t the only documentary star – ex-Rolling Stone Bill Wyman was in a short video, too: one about metal detecting. "Metal detecting is not just for anoraks or eccentrics; it's probably the best and most enjoyable way of learning about our history," he declares on his site. Wyman even has his own signature metal detector - so that’s where Keith Richards gets all of his jewelry. Maynard James Keenan, Tool Vocalist and Winemaker When Maynard James Keenan moved from Los Angeles to Jerome, Arizona, he not only found a lower-key lifestyle, but also fertile ground for his newfound hobby: winemaking. You might think this strange, but wine is in the man’s blood – not from the party last night, but years ago when his great-grandparents made wine somewhere in pre-World War II northern Italy. So naturally, Keenan opened a winery and vineyards and went to town. It’s even said that Puscifer’s latest release, "The Conditions of My Parole," was recorded in part among barrels at Keenan’s winery.

Be sure to check out:

The String Quartet Tribute to the Pixies Available now at iTunes and Amazon

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Rock the Casbah: Famous Music Venues

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The spirit of the infamous but now defunct New York music club CBGB will be reborn this summer, in the form of a music festival and movie. Originally intended to showcase the music styles it was named after (Country, BlueGrass, and Blues), CBGB became a breakout forum for Punk and New Wave bands like The Cramps, Ramones, Misfits and Talking Heads after it opened in 1973. Many mourned its closing in 2006 – but six years later, its death inspired a movie (coming to theaters in 2013) directed by Randall Miller and starring Alan Rickman as owner Hilly Kristal, Rupert Grint as Dead Boys guitarist Cheetah Chrome and Malin Akerman as Blondie’s Debbie Harry. The first CBGB music festival was also born this year, which will take place July 4 - 8 and will feature Cloud Nothings, The Pains of Being Pure at Heart, Guided By Voices and The War on Drugs. Here’s a look at some other infamous U.S. rock venues: Whisky A Go Go Location: Los Angeles, California Opened: January 16, 1964 Notable Acts: The Byrds, Alice Cooper, Buffalo Springfield and Love were regulars, and The Doors used to be the house band (until the debut of the oedipal lyrics in "The End" got them fired). Many British bands invaded the Whisky for their first headlining performances in the area, including The Kinks, The Who, Cream, Led Zeppelin and Oasis. One night…: The Doors opened for Van Morrison's band Them during a two-week residency in June, 1966. On the last night of the residency, the two Morrison bands (one headed by Jim, the other by Van) jammed together on "Gloria," a song written by Van Morrison that The Doors did their own sexually-charged cover of years later. Fillmore East Location: New York City, New York Opened: March 8, 1968 Notable Acts: Classic rock legends Jimi Hendrix, Van Morrison, Crosby, Stills, Nash and Young and Led Zeppelin (opening for Iron Butterfly!) played this historic venue during the brief three years it was open. The Allman Brothers Band played so many shows there that they were sometimes called "Bill Graham's House Band," after venue promoter Bill Graham. One night…: Jimi Hendrix’s Band of Gypsys was recorded live at the Fillmore East on New Year's Day 1970. What some people wouldn’t give to have been there… Red Rocks Amphitheatre Location: Morrison, Colorado Opened: 1906 Notable Acts: From opera singer Mary Garden in 1911 to The Beatles in 1964 (the only concert not sold out during their US tour), this natural amphitheatre has hosted many bands throughout the years. Many more bands have recorded live albums there, including U2, Neil Young, R.E.M., Phish and Coldplay. There’s just something about Red Rocks… One night…: During a 1971 sold-out Jethro Tull performance, about a thousand fans showed up without tickets and were directed by police to an area behind the theater where they could still hear the music but not see the band. Growing unsatisfied with what they were given (as humans often do) the fans charged the amphitheatre and were met with clouds of tear gas from the police. The winds blew the tear gas over the gates and into the amphitheatre. This "Riot at Red Rocks" led to a five-year ban of rock concerts at the venue. But they couldn’t keep the rock out of Red Rocks for long…

Be sure to check out

The String Quartet Tribute to the Doors Available now at VSQ Online Store, iTunes and Amazon

and also:

The String Quartet to the Who's "Tommy"

The String Quartet to Led Zeppelin

The String Quartet Tribute to Coldplay

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The Who’s Roger Daltrey Wants to Sing the Blues with Jimmy Page

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File this under “Things That Will Likely Never, Ever Happen but Would Be Kinda Awesome If They Did”: Roger Daltrey and Jimmy Page doing a blues album together. Maybe I’m being too negative. Maybe it will happen. It will if Roger Daltrey has his way about it; the front man for The Who has put the word out that this is something he’d love to do. “I’d love to do an album with Jimmy Page. He needs a singer to drive him. I’m a great blues singer,” Daltrey told BBC 6Music. “I don’t sing the blues with the Who, but that’s what I used to be before Townshend started writing. I used to be a great blues singer.” You can’t really hate on Daltrey for looking elsewhere for musical companionship; bandmate Pete Townshend’s well-known, ongoing issues with tinnitus have put the Who on indefinite hold as far as recording and touring. And Daltrey, who is still energetic and spry (trust this; I saw the Who just a couple of years ago and Roger Daltrey was bouncing around like a 21-year-old, with a pretty ripped body to match), is apparently looking for a new project to keep him occupied. If Daltrey and the Led Zeppelin guitarist were to collaborate, they would just be the latest in a long line of super groups and dynamic duos, a trend that seems (for who-knows-what reason) to be prevalent among more seasoned musical veterans. For example, Page’s Led Zeppelin bandmate Robert Plant released an album called Rising Sand with Alison Krauss, to heaps of critical acclaim. But until Jimmy Page responds to the invitation, Roger Daltrey has enough lined up for now: The Who has one scheduled show on March 30th, a cancer benefit at London’s Royal Albert Hall (where they are going to play Quadrophenia in its entirety, by the way), and this while in the middle of a much-anticipated tour with Eric Clapton, which started February 25th, 2010 in Pittsburgh. Take it easy, old man.

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